Spiritual Physics – Físicas Espirituales

AlyssaRodriguezSpiritual Physics

Monthly feature by Alyssa M. Rodriguez

The Internal Struggle of Voicing My Truth – Part 1

In July at the Mennonite Church USA Convention, I participated in the Youth Worship Service portion along with two other individuals. Ted Swartz, Kim Litwiller, and I shared about a time in our lives where we could not say for certain whether we sensed God with us.

That instance for me was overcoming an act of rape and continuing to struggle through the pregnancy and embrace the motherhood which resulted – rerouting my missionary term and life plans completely. In day one of the two-part worship series at Convention, youth experienced the uncertainty and doubt with us. Then, two days later, we touched on how retrospectively we have been able to witness God’s presence even in that dark time.

Months have passed since that convention and I continue to evaluate how telling my truth in front of thousands of young people went. I sat on stage with a video camera which projected my face to a crowd, but with stage lights blinding me: I couldn’t see the crowd. It was as though as soon as I sat down to answer questions about my story, as soon as I remembered how many people were listening to me and watching me live, my mind went blank.

I felt myself searching for the answers I had practiced and felt would be authentic and wholly speak to my experiences. But when I came up with words, I could only repeat the same thing over and over. The moderator graciously responded, trying to coax me through her questions.

It was a few short questions; yet afterwards, I walked off the stage in a fog of worry. “What just happened? I didn’t say what I planned to say.” “I forgot to mention a trigger warning and my sensitivity to the uniqueness of each person’s situation.” “That was NOT the way I wanted my truth to be told.” My fifteen minutes in the spotlight was up and I felt like I ruined the opportunity forever.

As this internal struggle continued, I walked the halls of the convention center and could not make it several steps without being affirmed over and over again by audience members. Even still, I regretted not getting to the nit and grit of my truth. “Was I being authentic like I hoped to be if I didn’t say everything I planned to?” “I sold these youth short. I missed the point.”

Then, a young girl came up to me as I tried to return to normalcy and buy food in a nearby market.

“I just wanted to say thank you for sharing your story. That was very brave of you. I have been through something similar . . . I did not end up pregnant, but . . . it meant a lot that you [told your story] in front of so many people. I don’t think I could ever do that.”

Suddenly, Paul’s words of making allowance for each other’s faults (Colossians 3) cleared away the previous fog I had experienced. It was clear to me that this girl was why I was there to tell my truth. And even if I had fallen short of my expectations, I was humbly and gently received in only a way I think the Holy Spirit is capable of facilitating.

***

Alyssa M. Rodriguez is an Iowa City native and member at First Mennonite Church. She is passionate about serving others and currently does so as a school health clinic coordinator for uninsured children and as a single mother to her one-year-old daughter, Zulema. Spiritual Physics is a monthly feature at ThirdWay.com

Físicas Espirituales

La Lucha Interna de Compartir Mi Verdad

En Julio en la Asamblea de Mennonite Church USA, participe en el culto de adoración para jóvenes junto con dos otras personas. Ted Swartz, Kim Litwiller y yo compartimos sobre una vez durante nuestras vidas cuando no pudimos decir con certeza que sentimos la presencia de dios con nosotros. El ejemplo mio era cuando fue superar una violacion que me dejo embarazada, luchar contra la prueba del embarazo y aprovechar el papel de maternidad – el último resultado de la violación. La oscuridad occurio cuando este evento cambió la ruta de mi vida como misionera. En el primer día de este serie de adorar, los jóvenes sintieron la incertidumbre y duda con nostros. Después de dos días, explicamos cómo, mirando atrás, hemos podido ser testigos de la presencia de dios aun en la maldad.

Ha pasado meses desde la asamblea y sigo evaluando como me fue expresando la verdad mia en frente de miles de jóvenes. Me senté en la plataforma, con mi cara proyectado por medio del videocámara al multitud que ni podía ver por tantas luces.

Me encontré buscando las respuestas que practicaba y que eran auténticas. Las respuestas que explicaron en pleno mis experiencias. Pero, cuando se me llegaron las palabras, solo salio la misma cosa. El moderador me contestó gentilmente con la ayuda de seguir la discusión.

Solo eran unas preguntitas; pero despues, me baje de la plataforma en una niebla de preocupación. “Que acabo de suceder? No dije lo que quería decir.” “Se me paso mencionar un aviso para los demás que han superado violación.” “Mis palabras no reflexionaron mi conocimiento que pasar por una violación es única para cada quien.” “No llegue al profundo de mi verdad.” “Era tan auténtica como quería ser si no dije TODO?” “Traicione mis propios valores.” “No llego al objetivo.”

Mientras luchaba internamente, una chica se me acercó.

“Solo le queria agradecer por compartir su historia. Que valiente. He pasado algo similar… no sali embarazada, pero… significó mucho que compartas en frente de tanta gente. No puedo que lo podría hacer nunca.”

De repente, las palabras Paulinas en Colosenses de darnos permiso los unos con los otros para nuestras fallas. Se despejó la niebla de antes. Fue evidente que esta chica fue la razón de porque me presente en la plataforma para compartir mi verdad. Y aunque tal vez no cumple con todas mis expectativas, ella me recibió con delicadez y humildad – una manera que solo era posible para el espíritu santo.

***

Alyssa M. Rodriguez nació en Iowa City, IA y es un miembro de First Mennonite Church. Esta apasionada para servir a los demás y lo hace en su vida cotidiano como coordinadora de una clinica medica que sirve niños sin seguro y es madre soltera su hija que tiene un año, Zulema.

 

Anthony, Edna, Angela and Aileen Villatoro with their father, Max.

Anthony, Edna, Angela and Aileen Villatoro with their father, Max.

Spiritual Physics

Flourishing Seeds

Monthly feature by Alyssa M. Rodriguez

Almost six months ago, Mennonite Pastor Max Villatoro was stripped away from his home and family in Iowa City, Iowa by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials. For Max’s wife and partner in pastoring, Gloria, and his four children Anthony, Edna, Angela and Aileen, the day they hoped would never come abruptly happened. Just as the sun was rising on an early March morning, it rerouted their family’s life course for what will probably be an indefinite amount of time.

After days of community mobilization unlike ever before in response to Max’s situation and before his family was truly able to say “goodbye” or “see you later,” he was forced to board a plane on a one-way trip to Honduras, a country he had not been to in 20 years.

Max’s story is probably not an unfamiliar one to many Mennonites across the country or even in other parts of the world. There is a Mexican proverb that goes, “They tried to bury us, but they didn’t know we were seeds.” Despite the tragedy of the situation, a response occurred whose grandiosity was mostly unexpected. This was due to what I believe was a natural reaction to the seeds Max had planted in his five years of pastoring and the many years before that on his Christian faith walk.

Fellow church people in Iowa and even individuals who didn’t know Max personally acted to fight for him to stay in the United States and to keep his family together. Over 30,000 people signed two different petitions and there were marches in Iowa and Virginia speaking out against his deportation. Still, ICE officials refused to look beyond his A-# and see the loving father and husband he was and the impact he has made as a pastor to his congregation at Torre Fuerte.

In the midst of the tragedy, people who never may have thought twice about the struggles of migrants who make dangerous journeys to flee even more dangerous life circumstances hoping to establish better lives for themselves and their families in the United States, were energized to act on these individuals’ behalf. And even though Max is still in Honduras, the action has not stopped.

An advocacy group in Max’s honor has been established to continue the conversation and education about immigration injustices like Max’s case and many others. (You can find more info about “Friends of Pastor Max” here: https://www.facebook.com/FriendsofPastorMax).

In addition, thanks to fundraising to support the Villatoro family who were left without their dad/husband, all four kids were able to visit their father in Honduras during summer vacation to hug him and laugh (and cry) with him in person–perhaps one last time for a while.

When the children came back they shared at a local Vacation Bible School about the service work Max is doing at a school in the Honduran community where he lives. He is helping to encourage kids to continue their studies longer and is helping limit their barriers to learning by collecting school supplies so their families do not have to come up with those expenses themselves. Though ICE officials attempted to be bury the seeds Max planted in Iowa, the seeds continue to grow in Honduras. Amen.

***

Alyssa M. Rodriguez is an Iowa City native and member at First Mennonite Church. She is passionate about serving others and currently does so as a school health clinic coordinator for uninsured children and as a single mother to her one-year-old daughter, Zulema. Spiritual Physics is a monthly feature at ThirdWay.com

 

Físicas Espirituales

Semillas Floricientas

Hace seis meses, Max Villatoro, el pastor de una iglesia menonita fue arrancado de su hogar y familia en Iowa City, Iowa por los oficiales del servicio inmigración y control de aduana de los estados unidos (ICE). Para Gloria, la esposa de Max y la quien acompañaba a Max en el trabajo de pastorear una iglesia, y sus cuatros hijos – Anthony, Edna, Angela y Aileen, el dia que nunca esperaban llegó de repente, durante el amanecer de un dia en Marzo. Su salida desvió el camino de la vida de la familia Villatoro por un tiempo indefinido.

Despues de días de movilización en la comunidad de Iowa City como respuesta al caso de Max y antes de que él y su familia podrian despedirse, ICE se le quitaron por la fuerza a embarcar un vuelo a Honduras, el país que solo conocía hace 20 anos atrás.

Será que la historia de Max suena familiar para muchas Menonitas en los Estados Unidos o en otros partes del mundo. Hay un refrán Mexicano que dice así: “Quisieron enterrarnos pero se les olvido que somos semillas”. A pesar de la tragedia del caso del Pastor Max, una respuesta tan impresionante que fue inesperado occurio, gracias a lo que yo creo fue una respuesta natural a las semillas que sembraba Max durante sus cinco anos de pastoreado y muchos anos más siguiendo el camino Cristiano.

Compañeros en las iglesias menonitas de Iowa y aun personas que no conocieron a Max personalmente actuaron y lucharon para que seguia en los Estados Unidos y para que su familia se podria mantener junta. Más que 30.0000 personas firmaron dos peticiones diferentes y hubo marchas en Iowa y Virginia en contra de la deportación de Max.

Sin embargo, la agencia de inmigración dejaron de notar el padre y esposo que Max es y el impacto que hacía como pastor con su iglesia Torre Fuerte. Solo lo notaron por su A-# (el manera de ICE cómo identificar los sin ciudadanía).

A pesar de la tragedia, personas quienes nunca hubiese pensado en la lucha inmigratoria y la decision de cruzar fronteras en un camino muy peligroso para huir circunstancias aún más peligrosas con la esperanza de establecer una vida mejor para sí mismo y sus familias en los estados unidos se animaron a actuar y luchar por gente como Max. Y aunque Max todavía está en Honduras, la acción no se ha parado.

Un grupo de apoyo se inauguró hace varias meses para seguir la conversación sobre la injusticia inmigratoria y para educar los demás sobre el caso de Max y otras personas. (Encuentre mas informacion sobre el grupo “Amigos del Pastor Max” aqui: https://www.facebook.com/FriendsofPastorMax).

Ademas de ganar fondos para apoyar la familia Villatoro que se quedó sin padre y esposo en los estados unidos, todos los hijos de Max visitaron su papá durante las vacaciones en Agosto cuando le abrazaron y se rieron juntos (y lloraron juntos) para lo que puede ser la última vez por un rato. Cuando sus hijos regresaron, compartieron en la escuela biblica sobre el trabajo Max está haciendo en una escuela local en Honduras. Allá, ayuda a animar los ninos a seguir sus estudios y ayuda a evitar las dificultades (económicas) de conseguir útiles para usar en el día cotidiano como estudiantes.

Aunque ICE intentó enterrar las semillas que sembraba Max en Iowa, siguen creciendo en Honduras. Amen.

Alyssa M. Rodriguez nació en Iowa City, IA y es un miembro de First Mennonite Church. Esta apasionada para servir a los demás y lo hace en su vida cotidiano como coordinadora de una clinica medica que sirve niños sin seguro y es madre soltera su hija que tiene un año, Zulema.

 

Spiritual Physics

Monthly feature by Alyssa M. Rodriguez

AlyssaRodriguez

Hello and Goodbye

Last week, a group of individuals from Quito, Ecuador stopped through my hometown on their way to Mennonite World Conference. Among other things, they got to see my home church, meet my parents, and greet my one-year-old daughter, Zulema. It was a joyous occasion.

The last time I had seen most of them, it was quite the opposite. I was sitting at a table in their home church—Quito Mennonite Church—saying “goodbye” and ending my international voluntary service term more than a year early because I had been raped and was pregnant.

From that moment to the one last week, much has been revealed to me about pain and redemption, loss and new life, and God’s presence amidst it all.

That is not to say that I have always been assured of God’s presence with me along the way to where I am today. I certainly haven’t answered all of the questions that came as I addressed the compartmentalized heartbreak of uprooting my life plan after surviving sexual assault and fighting to continue forward, as a mother.

As I stood at the pulpit last week with my brothers and sisters in Christ from Ecuador, translating a message from the church’s new Pastor, Luis Tapia, I was overtaken by the realness of his words, which led to tears.

He outlined the stories of two separate Colombian refugee families —each had experienced “new life” as they became active with the Quito Mennonite Church. Although they had suffered trauma that led to their lives uprooting to an entirely new country/culture, they had begun to witness God’s light through a new church family, something they’d never experienced before.

In Tapia’s words, death and violence do not have the ultimate word. And because we are one in the body of Christ and because of our faith in God’s son who was resurrected to bring new life here on earth, we have all been able to live to see a better day. And that to me, is what “spiritual physics”[1] is all about. God doesn’t allow something to die without making room for something new to live.

Join me over these next months in this column at Third Way website as I dissect my own, and the life experiences of others, regarding loss and new life from many different angles. It is my hope it will bring you a new appreciation for Jesus Christ, as it has for me.

[1] Bolz-Weber, Nadia. 2013. Pastrix, The Cranky, Beautiful Faith of a Sinner and Saint.

***

Alyssa M. Rodriguez is an Iowa City native and member at First Mennonite Church. She is passionate about serving others and currently does so as a school health clinic coordinator for uninsured children and as a single mother to her one-year-old daughter, Zulema. Spiritual Physics is a monthly feature at ThirdWay.com

Físicas Espirituales

Hola y adiós

La semana pasada un grupo de gente Ecuatoriano pasó por mi ciudad natal en el camino al congreso mundial menonita. Entre todo, el grupo conoció mi iglesia natal, conoció a mis papas y a mi hija Zulema. Fue un momento de mucha alegría.

En cambio, la última vez que nos reunimos, fue muy diferente. Me sentí en una mesa en su iglesia natal, la Iglesia Cristiana Anabautista Menonita de Ecuador (ICAME) y me despedí con ellos. Termine mi término de dos años con la red menonita temprano después de solo nueve meses. Fue violada y estaba embarazada.

Desde este momento al momento de la semana pasada, mucho se ha revelado a mí sobre el dolor y la redención; sobre el perder y la vida nueva y la presencia de Dios en medio de todo estas cosas.

Esto no quiere decir que siempre estaba asegurada de donde se encontraba Dios conmigo en el camino a donde he llegado hoy. Y definitivamente no tengo todas las respuestas a las preguntas que me preguntaba durante el sufrimiento que es arrancar mi plan de vida después de sobrevivir una violación y salir adelante como madre.

Mientras me pare al púlpito la semana pasada con mis hermanos en cristo de Ecuador y traduci el mensaje del Pastor Luis Tapia, sus palabras verdaderas me conmovieron y rompieron en llanto.

El Pastor resumió dos historias sobre dos familias refugiadas de Colombia. Cada uno experimentó “vida nueva” durante su participación con la iglesia menonita en Ecuador. Aunque sufrian un trauma que les desplazo y trajo a un país y una cultura totalmente nueva, empezaron a ser testigos a la luz de dios a través de una familia cristiana – algo nunca han experimentado antes.

En las palabras de Tapia, la violencia y la muerte no tienen la última palabra y porque somos uno en cristo y por nuestro fe en el hijo de dios quien resucitó y trajo vida nueva a este mundo terrenal, hemos podido vivir a ver días mejores. Y esto para mi significa “físicas espirituales”[2]. Dios no permite que algo muere sin dejar espacio para algo nuevo viva.

Unese conmigo en los meses que vienen mientros disecciono la vida mía y la vida de los demás y nuestros experiencias con perder y tener vida nueva desde muchos ángulos. Espero les traiga un agradecimiento nuevo para Jesucristo como me ha traído a mi.

***

Alyssa M. Rodriguez nació en Iowa City, IA y es un miembro de First Mennonite Church. Esta apasionada para servir a los demás y lo hace en su vida cotidiano como coordinadora de una clinica medica que sirve niños sin seguro y es madre soltera su hija que tiene un año, Zulema.

Físicas Espirituales – cada mes

[2]  Bolz-Weber, Nadia. 2013. Pastrix, The Cranky, Beautiful Faith of a Sinner and Saint.

 

Featured Products

A new Spanish translation of The Forgotten Ways by Alan Hirsch. Powerfully transforming for the church and individuals!

What do you do to keep your Christian life flourishing, no matter the season?